US Forces Sink ‘Houthi’ Boats Res Sea After Attack on Maersk Vessel

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US Forces Sink 'Houthi' Boats Res Sea After Attack on Maersk Vessel 4

After the attack on the Maersk ship, the US military sank ‘Houthi’ boats in the sea

The United States military says it has sunk three boats attacking a container ship in the Red Sea as it continues its patrol to counter threats from Yemen’s Houthi rebels.

Helicopters from two US warships – USS Eisenhower and USS Gravely – responding to an SOS call from Singapore on Sunday morning fired on “Iranian-backed Houthi small boats” in self-defense – flagged by US Central Command (CENTCOM). The vessel Maersk Hangzhou said. It said American helicopters sank three boats, killing many of their crew. The fourth boat escaped.

Maersk Hangzhou issued its distress call after it was fired upon by Houthi boats, which came as close as 20 meters (65 feet) and also tried to board her, said Centcom in a statement on Twitter, which was first published on Twitter. Was known by name.

As US helicopters responded, Houthi boats also fired on them, prompting them to return fire, the Centcon statement said.

After the attack on the Maersk ship, the US military sank 'Houthi' boats in the sea
US Forces Sink 'Houthi' Boats Res Sea After Attack on Maersk Vessel 5

It was the second alleged Houthi attack on Maersk Hangzhou in less than 24 hours. Late Saturday night, CENTCOM shot down ballistic missiles fired by the Houthis as it responded to a separate missile attack on the Maersk Hangzhou.

In the wake of the attacks, global shipping giant Maersk, which owns the ship, said it was suspending its operations in the Red Sea for 48 hours, highlighting the ongoing threat to commercial vessels in the region.

The Houthi group has not yet commented on the incidents.

After the attack on the Maersk ship, the US military sank ‘Houthi’ boats in the sea, details

invasion of the red sea

Amid Israel’s war on Gaza, Yemen’s Iran-aligned Houthis have repeatedly targeted ships belonging to Israel traveling in the Red Sea, forcing major global shipping companies like Maersk to abandon the waterway. Houthis attacks continue until Israeli attacks on Gaza stop.

The US on December 19 announced a global naval task force to protect shipping in the disputed waters, through which about 12 percent of global trade passes.

However, of the 20 countries that the US says have agreed to support the coalition, only the United Kingdom has directly contributed warships, effectively allowing Washington to “act alone”. For the Houthis Sardar has been released, reports AI Jazeera’s Rasul Sardar from the shores of Djibouti. the Red Sea.

US forces sink Houthi boats after attack on Maersk ship – USA TODAY News

The unrest in the Red Sea comes as anger is rising across the Middle East over the devastation in Gaza, where Israeli military strikes have killed at least 21,822 Palestinians, including 8,800 children, in three months.

The war began when Hamas launched a surprise cross-border attack on Israeli territory on October 7, killing approximately 1,140 people, mostly civilians, according to Israel.

The US, which has provided staunch military and diplomatic support to Israel throughout the conflict, has also targeted its assets, facing more than 100 attacks from Iran-backed groups in Syria and Iraq since the beginning of the war.

After the attack on the Maersk ship, the US military sank ‘Houthi’ boats in the sea
Are communication cables safe?

Amid concerns that Yemen’s Houthis could target vital submarine communications cables running beneath the Bab al-Mandab Strait that power the Internet network, Yemen’s Foreign Ministry said it is committed to protecting these networks. Is.

“Yemen’s decision to block the passage of Israeli enemy vessels does not concern vessels belonging to transnational companies licensed by the Ministry of Maritime Affairs Sanaa to execute submarine cable operations,” the ministry said.

However, it adds that vessels “performing submarine cable works” must “obtain the necessary permits and approvals”.

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